Publications

This section highlights the published work of our Faculty Affiliates. Got a recent publication to share? Email Amy Mast at amymast@umich.edu

 
Friday, January 12, 2018

This extensive literature review, conducted by a team of Masters students at the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability, seeks to develop a cost curve for established, demonstrated, and speculative carbon removal methods. This report has been altered and expanded in cooperation with the Energy Institute. 

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Climatic Change 144(2): 123-29.  

Friday, October 28, 2016

TE3 brings economic scholars together with government and industry practitioners to explore transportation and fuel research for energy and environmental policies that will foster progress toward long-term climate protection and business goals. 

amymast
Thursday, October 20, 2016

The 2016 UMEI Annual Report reviews the Energy Institute's progress on its various research initiatives and events, including the Battery Lab, the Energy Survey, REFRESCH, and the Beyond Carbon Neutral project. 

Saturday, October 01, 2016

Authors: John M. DeCicco, Danielle Yuqiao Liu, Joonghyeok Heo, Rashmi Krishnan, Angelika Kurthen and Louise Wang

ABSTRACT

Corn field
Friday, February 05, 2016

An interdisciplinary team of U-M sustainability experts and engineers led by School of Natural Resources and Environment Postdoctoral Associate Maryam Arbabzadeh has developed a “ green guide” to aid developers and operators of energy storage systems. Titled “12 Principles for Green Energy Storage in Grid Applications,” the 12 Principles offer researchers, designers and industry professionals a clear, concise picture of the most important criteria to consider when designing and operating sustainable energy storage devices and systems.

Thursday, February 04, 2016

This report is authored by U-M Department of Economics PhD student Alecia Cassidy. The energy efficiency gap is the failure of consumers or producers to make energy efficiency investments that would seemingly save money or increase profits. The phenomenon is important to understand, because if it exists and reflects irrational decisions on the part of consumers or firms, then policy intervention might be warranted. This report examines evidence for the energy efficiency gap in the automobile industry, and ultimately finds that the evidence is inconclusive. Three general approaches were employed: survey research, reduced-form analysis, and discrete choice modeling. Survey research finds evidence of an energy efficiency gap. Reduced-form analyses find no energy efficiency gap. The results of discrete choice models differ, with some finding evidence of an energy efficiency gap and others finding no evidence. 

Sunday, November 01, 2015

Understanding public perceptions of energy is important for informing energy-related business, research and policy strategies. To this end, a new U.S. consumer survey probes core attitudes about the reliability, affordability and environmental impact of energy. Appended quarterly to the long-running monthly survey of 500 households that produces the Index of Consumer Sentiment, this instrument inherits the sample design and statistical rigor of that household economic survey.

Monday, October 12, 2015

The light-duty vehicle fleet is expected to undergo substantial technological changes over the next several decades. New powertrain designs, alternative fuels, advanced materials and significant changes to the vehicle body are being driven by increasingly stringent fuel economy and greenhouse gas emission standards. By the end of the next decade, cars and light-duty trucks will be more fuel efficient, weigh less, emit less air pollutants, have more safety features, and will be more expensive to purchase relative to current vehicles. Though the gasoline-powered spark ignition engine will continue to be the dominant powertrain configuration even through 2030, such vehicles will be equipped with advanced technologies, materials, electronics and controls, and aerodynamics. And by 2030, the deployment of alternative methods to propel and fuel vehicles and alternative modes of transportation, including autonomous vehicles, will be well underway. What are these new technologies - how will they work, and will some technologies be more effective than others?

Monday, May 04, 2015

The Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP) conducts, supports and fosters applied academic research to inform local, state, and urban policy issues. Their Energy and Environmental Policy Initiative brings the latest academic knowledge to bear on issues of energy, environment, and climate policy. Below you'll find a list of links to energy - specific CLOSUP publications.

2015

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