Energy Policy

Wednesday, November 09, 2016
President…Donald…Trump. For those on both sides of the aisle who vowed “Never Trump!,” that’s going to take some getting used to. On this morning after a stunning election, the first impulse may be to describe the future in apocalyptic phrases. Game over for the climate! Game over for NATO! Game over for the Clean Power Plan! Game over for Planned Parenthood!
Tuesday, September 06, 2016

Energy Institute Research Professor John DeCicco’s newly published research in Climatic Change, “Carbon balance effects of U.S. biofuel production and use,” has been covered and discussed in media around the country during the past two weeks. Check out a selection of articles below. 

Biofuels worse for climate change than gasoline, U-M study says

Detroit Free Press

Research Professor John DeCicco
Nov
02
4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

Location details: Annenberg Auditorium 1120, Joan & Sanford Weill Hall

Thursday, August 25, 2016

A new study from University of Michigan researchers challenges the widely held assumption that biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel are inherently carbon neutral.

Contrary to popular belief, the heat-trapping carbon dioxide gas emitted when biofuels are burned is not fully balanced by the CO2 uptake that occurs as the plants grow, according to a study by research professor John DeCicco and co-authors at the U-M Energy Institute.

Oct
03
11:30 AM to 1:00 PM

Reclaiming the Atmospheric Commons:  A New Strategy for Climate Policy Success?

Leigh Raymond, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Environment at Purdue University

11:30am-1:00pm (Pizza lunch provided at 11:30am, lecture begins at 11:40am)

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by:

Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP)

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Consumers Energy in April closed seven of its coal-burning units.

DTE Energy plans to shut eight of its coal-burning units by the year 2023.

Mark Barteau is Director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.  He says eventually, coal is going away because natural gas, wind and solar are more cost-effective - as well as being better for public health and the planet.

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